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Your World’s Guest List Not Very Fair And Balanced

Reported by Guest Blogger - August 9, 2010 -

By Brian

Neil Cavuto devoted most of Your World on Friday (8/6/10) to highlighting the disappointing jobs report of the day. Would Cavuto have devoted this much time to a bad jobs number if a Republican was President? What do you think? And of course, he operated with an unfair and unbalanced guest list!

The show opened with a clip from Fox's 1997 movie, Titanic. Cavuto showed the part where people fell off the ship. Cavuto said "It's that sinking feeling. One number (graphic showed 131,000; music-dumb, dumbbbbb), one down (picture of Christina Romer with dumb, dumbbbb music), and questions about whether the President of the United States should throw his entire economic team overboard. Is the White House looking at all the wrong places to replace her? More proof that the Bush tax cuts might have to be extended?"

I don’t usually post a guest list, but this day is different. Cavuto's coverage of the 131,000 jobs lost in July featured the following:

Art Laffer - former Reagan economic advisor. During the interview, Fox happened to show that 3.3 million people have lost jobs since Obama became President; I don't think they would've showed this number if Obama were a Republican.

Next, Bob Cusack, the Hill Managing Editor on a $26 billion state aid bill

Mike Slater, conservative radio talk show host

Donald Trump (not far right, but conservative).

Next, Charles Payne, another conservative, talking about housing.

Steve Moore of the Wall Street Journal, conservative.

Steven Groves of the conservative Heritage Foundation spoke about a tax on air fares to fight climate change.

Finally, fifty minutes in, Simon Rosenberg of the New Democratic Network, who was interrupted routinely, spoke about the expiring Bush tax cuts

Six conservatives, one liberal, one correspondent.


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